the Guangyou Temple

Last updated by joyce at 2015/4/26

The Guangyou Temple in Liaoyang is one of the earliest temples which have been built after Buddhism was introduced into China. It had been rebuilt several times in the Jin, Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasty. In its prime time, the Temple has covered an area of about 90,000 square meters. It has 200 temples and is the largest place for the Buddhist activities in northeast China. In the 21st year of Kangxi in the Qing Dynasty, the Emperor Xuanye wrote a poem for the Guangyou Temple when he came to Liaoyang in his eastern patrol. In 1900, the Guangyou Temple was burned by the invaders from Russia, and was discarded since then. Not until 2002 when it was a flourishing age was the Temple rebuilt. The new Guangyou Temple is grand and magnificent. The bluestone torii before the mountain gate is 34 meters wide and 16 meters high. There are five gates and six posts which are very tall and delicately-made. The torii is one of the best in China. On both sides of the mountain gates stands a copper statue. On the left is the Carriages Going Out, which draws materials from Carriages Going Out, a fresco in the tombs of the Eastern Han Dynasty and the Western Han Dynasty. The work features the vivid scene of the officials of the eastern ad southern parts of Liaoning province scudding by carriages, and shows the very style of Han and Wei which have been in possession of the northeastern parts of the ancient Xiangping. On the right is Riding on the Crane and Becoming Immortal, a statue drawing materials from a folk legend.

Solo Adventure Tips:


No.60, Zhonghua Street, Liaoyang City

How to Get There?
you can take Bus No. 7, No.1, or No. 4 and get off at the Guangchang Station.

Ticket Price:

50 yuan per person

Opening Hours:
it depends on how many people come to visit

More Tips:
Recommended time for tour: one hour

Information accuracy:

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